Happy 10th Birthday to Trevor’s Birding

Happy Birthday to Trevor’s Birding.

10 years old today.

Goodness, how the years have flown since my very first post on this site. That was actually on a different platform and has been updated several times over the years.

A few statistics

  • A total of 1668 articles about birds and birding
  • Well over 5300 comments from my readers
  • Several thousand photos shown
  • Visitors from over 200 countries and territories
  • Over a million pageviews from well over half a million visitors

Travels

Wherever I travel I take my camera, binoculars, notebook and field guide and fit in times of birding (bird watching) and bird photography whenever I can. On many occasions I also go out and about near my home for the deliberate purpose of birding. On my return home I then enjoy writing on this site about the birds I have seen and sharing the best of my photos. Some of these travels take me to other states in Australia as well, especially when we visit family in Sydney, and friends in other places.

Archives

Some of my readers may not be aware of the many hundreds of articles in my archives – 1668 articles to be precise – and growing every few days with new articles. These can be accessed via the button at the top of each page and range from the most recent to the very first article. Here is a treasure trove of writing about birds.

Contents

Another way of accessing articles on specific areas of interest is via the Contents on the side bar, including

Categories and search

Another way of searching for specific information on this site it to use the search facility (in the top right hand corner of each page). Just type in what you are looking for – you might be surprised what comes up. The categories section on the sidebar is another area where you can search for articles on a particular species or topic. If all that doesn’t work, try the contact form – also at the top of each page. Send your questions to me via email and I will reply as soon as I can, noting that there will be a delay if I am busy out birding and away from my computer.

Comments

Every article has a comments section and I would love to have many more. The 5300 comments so far are just the beginning. Just remember that they are moderated, and I reserve the right not to accept, or delete, or even edit comments, so keep them civil and in good taste. Children often read the articles here.

Photos

Over the years I have shared many photos here, with many more to come. Today, however, I decided to share a few of my favourite ones (see below).

Enjoy.

And keep coming back for more.

Good birding.

Trevor

 

Further reading:

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Crested Pigeon

Female Galah, Laratinga Wetlands

Female Galah, Laratinga Wetlands

Male Variegated Fairy-wren

Male Variegated Fairy-wren

Musk Lorikeets

Musk Lorikeets

Beautiful Bronzewing Pigeons

Common Bronzewing, Laratinga Wetlands

Common Bronzewing, Laratinga Wetlands

Common Bronzewing Pigeons are, on first appearance, a reasonably plain bird. It is only when one gets an individual sitting quietly in a sunny position that you get a full appreciation of the subtle and quite beautiful colours in the plumage of this species. This is what happened to me recently on a visit to the Laratinga Wetlands in Mt Barker, South Australia. I seem to recall seeing at least three birds on that visit; there may have been more that I didn’t see.

In my experience Common Bronzewings are very flighty, nervous birds and will fly off rapidly as you approach. This can make them sometimes hard to photograph in the bush. At Laratinga they have obviously become accustomed to the hundreds of local people and tourists who visit this site every day. Walkers, joggers, photographers and cyclists frequently use the many good paths around the dozen or so ponds making up the wetlands, so it is not surprising that the local bronzewings will tolerate a person coming to within a few metres.

The birds in today’s photos were only about three metres from me so I was able to get some close up shots. The early morning sun shining on their feathers shows off some of the beautiful colours.

Further reading:

Common Bronzewing, Laratinga Wetlands

Common Bronzewing, Laratinga Wetlands

Common Bronzewing, Laratinga Wetlands

Common Bronzewing, Laratinga Wetlands

Common Bronzewing, Laratinga Wetlands

Common Bronzewing, Laratinga Wetlands

Dusky Moorhens at Laratinga Wetlands

Dusky Moorhen, Laratinga Wetlands

Dusky Moorhen, Laratinga Wetlands

Over recent posts here on my site I have featured some of the birds I saw and photographed on a recent visit to the Laratinga Wetlands in Mt Barker, South Australia. As I have stated before, this is one of my favourite birding places to visit because of the large number and variety of birds present all year on the dozen or so ponds which make up the wetlands. Besides, it is about a half hour drive from my home.

Apart from the ease of getting there, and the good variety of birds, another benefit is being able to access the various ponds via a great network of walking paths. These paths are used daily by hundreds of locals and visitors for walking, running, cycling and birding. From the paths visitors have a great view of the birdlife and this makes photography a delight there. On many occasions the paths themselves afford good photographic opportunities.

A example of this on my most recent visit was a small flock of Red-browed Finches drinking from some puddles on the path. Unfortunately the puddles were in deep shade, and the birds constantly moving, so my shots of them turned out very blurry. You get that.

On the other hand, today’s photos feature several Dusky Moorhens feeding on the grassy verges of one of the paths – and in full sunlight. It made it a little easier to get some photos, but on the downside, they were a little skittish.

Dusky Moorhens are often found near bodies of water like the Laratinga Wetlands and often associate with both Purple Swamphens and Eurasian Coots. They found throughout the eastern half of the Australian mainland as well as SW Western Australia and Tasmania.

Further reading:

Dusky Moorhen, Laratinga Wetlands

Dusky Moorhen, Laratinga Wetlands

Dusky Moorhen, Laratinga Wetlands

Dusky Moorhen, Laratinga Wetlands

Cruising Grey Teals, Laratinga Wetlands

Grey Teal, Laratinga Wetlands, Mt Barker

Grey Teal, Laratinga Wetlands, Mt Barker

A few days ago I featured a Pacific Black Duck I saw at the Laratinga Wetlands in Mt Barker.

Today it is the turn of another common species, the Grey Teal.

This great birding site is just over half an hour’s drive from my home in Murray Bridge here in South Australia. I don’t get to visit often enough. I know of birders who visit this place almost every day. The birding is usually very good with many opportunities for bird photography.

The ponds making up these wetlands have wide tracks along their edges and many locals and visitors use these tracks on a daily basis for walking, cycling and jogging. The adjacent picnic grounds are also very well set out and maintained.

On a recent visit I took these photos of some Grey Teal cruising along across one of the ponds. Many birders and photographers probably overlook this common species. It can be found in many parts of Australia wherever bodies of water exist.

I have seen lakes where there were thousands of these ducks. Just because they are common does not mean that they cannot be photographic. I like the photo above, but the one below is something special, in my opinion. The photo has only been cropped a little and has not been enhanced in any other way.

For more photos and further reading about the birds of Laratinga, click here.

Good birding.

Trevor

Grey Teal, Laratinga Wetlands, Mt Barker

Grey Teal, Laratinga Wetlands, Mt Barker

Hey Duck! Look here!

Pacific Black Duck, Laratinga Wetlands, Mt Barker

Pacific Black Duck, Laratinga Wetlands, Mt Barker

The Pacific Black Duck is a common bird in many parts of Australia. Wherever there is a dam, pond, lake, wetland, swamp, river, estuary or other body of water the observant birder will often see this species, frequently in large numbers. Many tend to overlook this species because they are so common, but I love to photograph them whenever I get the chance. I guess, to be honest, I just like taking photographs of birds.

On a recent birding visit to the Laratinga Wetlands in Mt Barker, South Australia, this Pacific Black Duck was resting on the wooden walkway over one of the ponds. I zoomed my camera lens in to get a good shot but it kept looking the other way. I tried asking it to turn my way but it generally ignored me. Eventually it sort of looked towards me – see the photo below – but wasn’t  really interested in becoming the next big photographic star on the web.

Can’t say I blame it. It was freezing cold that morning. It was probably just trying to get warm in the early morning sun.

I will post more photos from from this site of more cooperative birds in the coming days.

Good Birding.

Trevor

Pacific Black Duck, Laratinga Wetlands, Mt Barker

Pacific Black Duck, Laratinga Wetlands, Mt Barker